Browsing articles in "Uncategorized"
May
18

Christina and I are doing 24HHH again!

So, the lovely and talented Christina Kennon and I will be tackling 24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell again this year. We’re excited, but I realized that many people might not know much about one or the other of us at this point in time. For example, I bet you didn’t know that both Christina and myself are still 90% raw fruitarians. Wild, right? What to do? Tell you of course! This page should also work marvelously as we line up sponsors for the event in getting to know us a little better as well. If anyone has any questions that aren’t covered here, then by all means shoot me a message and we’ll try and get you answers. Cheers!

Josh Burns

Age:

32 years young

Weight

175 lbs, 79 kilos

Height:

6’3″, 190.5cm

Climbing Experience:

10 years

Shirt Size:

Medium

Waist:

30″, 76 cm

Inseam:

34″, 86 cm

Favorite Food:

Smoothies of course!

Christina Kennon

Age:

25 years old

Weight

115 lbs, 52 kilos

Height:

5’4″, 162.5 cm

Climbing Experience:

2.5 intense years

Shirt Size:

Small

Waist:

26″, 66 cm

Inseam:

27″, 68.5 cm

Favorite Food:

Dates are great!

We can’t wait to participate again.  Yes, it’s greuling.  Yes it tests everything about yourself, and your climbing partner’s relationship.  That’s why it’s so much more gratifying than all of the other climbing comps out there!

Wish us luck and follow us along the way!

We’ll be posting progress as well as documenting our experience this year thanks to Christina’s video production hookups.  It should be a blast!

Jul
2

A Little About The Best Team Competing in 24HHH

By Josh  //  Uncategorized  //  No Comments
So, the lovely and talented Christina Kennon and I will be tackling 24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell this year. We’re excited, but I realized that many people might not know much about one or the other of us at this point in time. For example, I bet you didn’t know that both Christina and myself are 90% raw fruitarians. Wild, right?

What to do? Tell you of course! This page should also work marvelously as we line up sponsors for the event in getting to know us a little better as well. If anyone has any questions that aren’t covered here, then by all means shoot me a message and we’ll try and get you answers. Cheers!

Josh Burns


Age:
31 years young
Weight
175 lbs, 79 kilos
Height:
6’3″, 190.5cm
Climbing Experience:
10 years
Shirt Size:
Medium
Waist:
30″, 76 cm
Inseam:
34″, 86 cm
Favorite Food:
Smoothies of course!


Christina Kennon


Age:
24 years old
Weight
115 lbs, 52 kilos
Height:
5’4″, 162.5 cm
Climbing Experience:
1.5 intense years
Shirt Size:
Small
Waist:
26″, 66 cm
Inseam:
27″, 68.5 cm
Favorite Food:
Dates are great!




















Oct
22

Mind Blowing Indeed…

By Josh  //  Uncategorized  //  No Comments

Found this on thought Catalog. All Credit to David Cain. I’m just copying and pasting for my own reference if Thought Catalog ever takes it down.

Over the years I’ve learned dozens of little tricks and insights for making life more fulfilling. They’ve added up to a significant improvement in the ease and quality of my day-to-day life. But the major breakthroughs have come from a handful of insights that completely rocked my world and redefined reality forever.

The world now seems to be a completely different one than the one I lived in about ten years ago, when I started looking into the mechanics of quality of life. It wasn’t the world (and its people) that changed really, it was how I thought of it.

Maybe you’ve had some of  the same insights. Or maybe you’re about to.

1. You are not your mind.

The first time I heard somebody say that, I didn’t like the sound of it one bit. What else could I be? I had taken for granted that the mental chatter in my head was the central “me” that all the experiences in my life were happening to.

I see quite clearly now that life is nothing but passing experiences, and my thoughts are just one more category of things I experience. Thoughts are no more fundamental than smells, sights and sounds. Like any experience, they arise in my awareness, they have a certain texture, and then they give way to something else.

If you can observe your thoughts just like you can observe other objects, who’s doing the observing? Don’t answer too quickly. This question, and its unspeakable answer, are at the center of all the great religions and spiritual traditions.

2. Life unfolds only in moments.

Of course! I once called this the most important thing I ever learned. Nobody has ever experienced anything that wasn’t part of a single moment unfolding. That means life’s only challenge is dealing with the single moment you are having right now. Before I recognized this, I was constantly trying to solve my entire life — battling problems that weren’t actually happening. Anyone can summon the resolve to deal with a single, present moment, as long as they are truly aware that it’s their only point of contact with life, and therefore there is nothing else one can do that can possibly be useful. Nobody can deal with the past or future, because, both only exist as thoughts, in the present. But we can kill ourselves trying.

3. Quality of life is determined by how you deal with your moments, not which moments happen and which don’t.

I now consider this truth to be Happiness 101, but it’s amazing how tempting it still is to grasp at control of every circumstance to try to make sure I get exactly what I want. To encounter an undesirable situation and work with it willingly is the mark of a wise and happy person. Imagine getting a flat tire, falling ill at a bad time, or knocking something over and breaking it – and suffering nothing from it. There is nothing to fear if you agree with yourself to deal willingly with adversity whenever it does show up. That is how to make life better. The typical, low-leverage method is to hope that you eventually accumulate power over your circumstances so that you can get what you want more often. There’s an excellent line in a Modest Mouse song, celebrating this side-effect of wisdom: As life gets longer, awful feels softer.

4. Most of life is imaginary.

Human beings have a habit of compulsive thinking that is so pervasive that we lose sight of the fact that we are nearly always thinking. Most of what we interact with is not the world itself, but our beliefs about it, our expectations of it, and our personal interests in it. We have a very difficult time observing something without confusing it with the thoughts we have about it, and so the bulk of what we experience in life is imaginary things. As Mark Twain said: “I’ve been through some terrible things in my life, some of which actually happened.” The best treatment I’ve found? Cultivating mindfulness.

5. Human beings have evolved to suffer, and we are better at suffering than anything else.

Yikes. It doesn’t sound like a very liberating discovery. I used to believe that if I was suffering it meant that there was something wrong with me — that I was doing life “wrong.” Suffering is completely human and completely normal, and there is a very good reason for its existence. Life’s persistent background hum of “this isn’t quite okay, I need to improve this,” coupled with occasional intense flashes of horror and adrenaline are what kept human beings alive for millions of years. This urge to change or escape the present moment drives nearly all of our behavior. It’s a simple and ruthless survival mechanism which works exceedingly well for keeping us alive, but it has a horrific side effect: human beings suffer greatly by their very nature. This, for me, redefined every one of life’s problems as some tendril of the human condition. As grim as it sounds, this insight is liberating because it means: 1) that suffering does not necessarily mean my life is going wrong, 2) that the ball is always in my court, so the degree to which I suffer is ultimately up to me, and 3) that all problems have the same cause and the same solution.

6. Emotions exist to make us biased.

This discovery was a complete 180 from my old understanding of emotions. I used to think my emotions were reliable indicators of the state of my life — of whether I’m on the right track or not. Your passing emotional states can’t be trusted for measuring your self-worth or your position in life, but they are great at teaching you what it is you can’t let go of. The trouble is that emotions make us both more biased and more forceful at the same time. Another survival mechanism with nasty side-effects.

7. All people operate from the same two motivations: to fulfill their desires and to escape their suffering.

Learning this allowed me to finally make sense of how people can hurt each other so badly. The best explanation I had before this was that some people are just bad. What a cop-out. No matter what kind of behavior other people exhibit, they are acting in the most effective way they are capable of (at that moment) to fulfill a desire or to relieve their suffering. These are motives we can all understand; we only vary in method, and the methods each of us has at our disposal depend on our upbringing and our experiences in life, as well as our state of consciousness. Some methods are skillful and helpful to others, others are unskillful and destructive, and almost all destructive behavior is unconscious. So there is no good and evil, only smart and dumb (or wise and foolish). Understanding this completely shook my long-held notions of morality and justice.

8. Beliefs are nothing to be proud of.

Believing something is not an accomplishment. I grew up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they’re really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because “strength of belief” is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you’ve made it a part of your ego. Listen to any “die-hard” conservative or liberal talk about their deepest beliefs and you are listening to somebody who will never hear what you say on any matter that matters to them — unless you believe the same. It is gratifying to speak forcefully, it is gratifying to be agreed with, and this high is what the die-hards are chasing. Wherever there is a belief, there is a closed door. Take on the beliefs that stand up to your most honest, humble scrutiny, and never be afraid to lose them.

9. Objectivity is subjective.

Life is a subjective experience and that cannot be escaped. Every experience I have comes through my own, personal, unsharable viewpoint. There can be no peer reviews of my direct experience, no real corroboration. This has some major implications for how I live my life. The most immediate one is that I realize I must trust my own personal experience, because nobody else has this angle, and I only have this angle. Another is that I feel more wonder for the world around me, knowing that any “objective” understanding I claim to have of the world is built entirely from scratch, by me. What I do build depends on the books I’ve read, the people I’ve met, and the experiences I’ve had. It means I will never see the world quite like anyone else, which means I will never live in quite the same world as anyone else — and therefore I mustn’t let outside observers be the authority on who I am or what life is really like for me. Subjectivity is primary experience — it is real life, and objectivity is something each of us builds on top of it in our minds, privately, in order to explain it all. This truth has world-shattering implications for the roles of religion and science in the lives of those who grasp it.

What have you discovered that turned your world upside down? TC Mark

Aug
30

Cauliflower Pizza Crust?!?!

By Josh  //  Uncategorized  //  No Comments

I must try this (from reddit /r/food):

CRUST
(recipe makes two 10″ crusts)
1 medium head cauliflower, cored and separated into medium florets (approx 2 1/2 cups)
1 large egg
1/2 cup part skim mozzarella cheese
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 teaspoons garlic salt
Buffalo chicken topping or Roasted vegetable topping (recipes follows)
Using a food processor, pulse the florets until it looks like rice. Place the cauliflower crumbles in a large, microwave safe bowl and microwave them on “high” for 8-10 minutes, or until softened. Allow to cool a few minutes. Using a clean dish cloth, a sieve or a ricer, squeeze as much water as possible from the cauliflower.
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and spray with cooking spray. In a medium bowl, combine1 1/2 cups of cauliflower, egg, cheese, oregano and garlic salt. Pour the mix onto the pan and shape the crust into a 9 to 12-inch round on the prepared. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until golden and crisp.
Roasted Vegetable Topping
1 cup tomato sauce (I used Rao’s Homemade Arrabiata sauce)
1/2 cup grated part skim mozzarella
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1 yellow onion, finely sliced
1 tablespoon canola oil
1/4 cup asparagus, cut down the middle
1/4 cup bell pepper, finely sliced
1/4 cup yellow squash, finely sliced
Basil leaves
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (more if you like it spicy)
Kosher salt
Heat the tomato sauce in a saucepan over medium low heat until thickened.
In a separate pan, heat canola oil over medium heat and add yellow onions. season with a pinch of salt and drop heat to medium low until transluscent. Add sliced mushrooms and cook until the mushrooms are soft and the onions begin to caramalize, approximately 10-15 minutes.
Spread the tomato sauce on top of the baked crust, leaving a 1/2-inch border around the edge. Sprinkle 1/4 cup mozzarella on top. Add the mushrooms and onions, spreading it out around the pizza. Sprinkle the remaining cheese on top. Add asparagus, bell peppers, squash and basil leaves. Sprinkle with crushed red pepper and season with kosher salt.
Set the oven to broil and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until the toppings are cooked and the has melted and bubbled. Cut into 6 slices and serve immediately.
Buffalo Chicken Topping
3 oz plain nonfat yogurt
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
1 chicken breast, thinly sliced and wicked of excess moisture
1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup Franks Red Hot Sauce
1/4 cup canola oil
1/2 cup grated part skim mozzarella
Season the chicken with salt and pepper and coat with all purpose flour. Shake off the excess and set aside. In a medium saucepan, heat the 1/4 cup canola oil on high heat. Slowly add the chicken pieces and cook until crisp and golden brown, about 1 minute per side. Remove from the oil and transfer to a paper towel. Combine with the Frank’s Hot sauce in a small bowl and set aside.
To make the faux-blue cheese sauce, combine the yogurt, vinegar, lemon juice, and garlic powder in a small bowl. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Drizzle the sauce on top of the baked crust. Add the chicken and hot sauce to the top. Sprinkle 1/4 cup mozzarella on top. Set the oven to broil and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until the toppings are cooked and the has melted and bubbled. Cut into 6 slices and serve immediately.
Also, I have more photos and the full nutritional information at www.sashasfocaccia.com, if you’re so inclined to check it out. It’s a low-cal focused food blog that I started a couple weeks ago. Glad you all like the pics! It’s not easy with my old point and shoot…

Aug
20

My Grandmother’s Sugar Cookies

By Josh  //  Uncategorized  //  No Comments

Try them, they’re good. Really good.
Cream together 1 c sugar, 1 c powdered sugar, 1c oil, and 1 c butter/margarine. Beat in 2 eggs and 1 tsp vanilla. Add 1 tsp soda, 1 tsp cream of tarter, and 4 c flour. Beat by hand.

Roll into rounded teaspoon balls and place on cookie sheet. Rub the bottom of a glass in the cookie dough and then in sugar. Press the ball flat. bake at 350 for about 8 minutes.

You can also roll the dough out on lightly floured surface and cut with cookie cutters. And then bake.

Jul
10

I love Stephanie Georgopulos

By Josh  //  Uncategorized  //  No Comments

She is beyond spectacular.

See example below:

I’m Tired Of Reading About Us

I’m tired of reading about us: the nuance and complexity of our fusion spilled out in black and white like this sort of thing happens every day, to everyone. I resent the way Davis exposes the quiet superiority you feel over me and turns it up to volume ten; I loathe Franzen for holding a mirror up to my eagerness, reflecting how obvious it is to the rest of the world and how obvious it is to you. I hate Sedaris for exploiting every night the city breathed differently because you and I were moving through it together, why would he tell everyone about that? Our insecurities and vulnerable parts typed up and mass-produced and handled by commuters and students and pedants, it’s exhausting.

And I can’t even turn on the radio anymore without hearing our stories stretched out over sound waves; one band asking if you’re going to leave and a second, more confident voice insisting you’re capable of loving me if you’d only try and one more still that urges us to be young, to embrace our infant blood and each other and it’s no wonder you feel smothered, no wonder this is moving too quickly. It’s all we can think about, all we can hear, all this noise.

When we turn on the television to witness two better-looking versions of us recite our affections almost verbatim, understudies learned in pillow talk. When we rent an old film and there we are, ancient characters created preemptively to act out our arguments like someone knew we were going to happen before we were so much as a thought to anyone, let alone to each other. When we go to the movies and watch paid actors mimic the eyes and the lips and the hands on a big screen while strangers take voyeuristic pleasure in knowing the curve our two bodies create. When the audience applauds or cries or laughs at our intricacies and I have no choice but to feel naked.

We are either the world’s greatest muses or its most common lovers — this is what I think whenever I read these words or hear these songs or watch these images — so I instead imagine the missing parts that have yet to be written: the way your body smells after two days, the taste of the back of your teeth and other places most will never find their tongues, the perfect sour of your breath after a too-long night that lasted just the perfect amount of time. I imagine the static that forms in my stomach and courses through every capillary whenever you brush against me accidentally and the texture of your favorite sweater and the militant veins that protrude from your arms like they’re dying to be noticed, touched. When I think about these things — the symphony of color in your eyes and what might be happening behind them — I know they haven’t got us completely figured out. I know that some things belong to only us.

Jul
10

Wild Warsan Shire Goodness

By Josh  //  Uncategorized  //  No Comments

Someone who gets me pointed me to this today. It’s not the first time I’ve read it, but it has been a while, and I want to remember it.

you are a horse running alone
and he tries to tame you
compares you to an impossible highway
to a burning house
says you are blinding him
that he could never leave you
forget you
want anything but you
you dizzy him, you are unbearable
every woman before or after you
is doused in your name
you fill his mouth
his teeth ache with memory of taste
his body just a long shadow seeking yours
but you are always too intense
frightening in the way you want him
unashamed and sacrificial
he tells you that no man can live up to the one who
lives in your head
and you tried to change didn’t you?
closed your mouth more
tried to be softer
prettier
less volatile, less awake
but even when sleeping you could feel
him travelling away from you in his dreams
so what did you want to do love
split his head open?
you can’t make homes out of human beings
someone should have already told you that
and if he wants to leave
then let him leave
you are terrifying
and strange and beautiful
something not everyone knows how to love.

Feb
22

Awestruck By Incredible Writing…

I ran across this piece written by Jimmy Chen. His ability to choose words is astounding.
His sentiments are profound as well in his Internet Like Story.

Just in case it gets removed from the site it’s copied below as well:

Internet Like Story
FEB. 15, 2012 By JIMMY CHEN
In 2002, I published a story online at a rather popular website. That same day, at around 3:30 p.m., I received an email from who would become my first girlfriend. I can still see the subject heading, bolded with mystery: hi. “Who are you?” the email read, which began a six month correspondence, until I moved in with her. First it was emails, then gradually, with worn out fingers and softened hearts, phone calls. This was before texting. The first time I called her at 7:02 p.m., two minutes late from our agreed upon time, she said with a tiny voice that she had been staring at her phone waiting for its light to shine. I was that light.

This was also before wi-fi, when having internet at your home was sort of a “big deal,” like only .com-ers or very well adjusted yuppies had it, and so I — unemployed at the time, with grave and unsound artistic ventures — went to the public library two or three times a day eagerly and obsessively checking my hotmail for the latest installment of our wordy courtship. Seeing her name, swollen, bold with hope; clicking on it, holding my breath at her words, until rested assured that things were fine. Very lonely people tend to find each other, like a split atom trying to be whole again. Yes, it was sad, but wonderful.

She kept our entire correspondence in a folder and printed it out for me upon my arrival. It was the size of a novel manuscript, a complete ream of paper. Backwards meta, we read it together in bed. I’ll fast forward here and simply say that “life” happened. Or, insert the scatological expletive. We lived together for a year, she broke up with me, I moved out. Simple stuff here. Turns out we just liked each other. If you had asked me to recount what happened back then, I would have typed you another novel, but today, ten years later, I can only spare you these little sentences. Feelings die, and when they come back to life, they are less angry and more tired.

We broke up during Friendster, as I remember obsessively checking her friends’ comments in order to gather details of her life to fully torture myself with. Her friends, it seemed, corroborated scripted comments directed at me. We somewhat made up on Myspace, an exchange of two or three quick cordial messages noting how we were. Too much time has passed for me to friend her on Facebook, though I occasionally find her profile, just to keep up with how she looks, where she lives, etc. Her face is the same one I looked into at the airport — the magazine not-being-read in her lap, the getting up and walking towards me, the soft smile before the hug, the hug before the kiss, the kiss before the breath from which it came was done.

_____________

In 2012, today, I publish a piece of non-fiction at a rather popular website. At around 3:30 p.m., I may receive a “like” from someone, her disqus avatar a tiny portrait floating as a raft on the sea of this white background, above the flotsam and jetsam of comments. I will click the link to her twitter, or tumblr, or whatever, to glean her impossible somethingness — that imposition of one’s nothingness — taking into morose consideration how this picture is likely self-curated, the best out of a set of half-a-dozen pictures taken that night, for the very purpose of extending her tiny effigy into this world, in her room, her macbook’s tiny cam the unblinking cyclops she is currently in a relationship with.

Ongoing romantic failures with those whom I’ve met online by way of my writing will flash quickly through my head, like some manic multi-frame animated .gif repeating in an ennui loop. A young woman recently said that I’m not the writer I am online: less confident, less humorous, less sexual, less thoughtful, less glib, more just me. My heart and erection sank. Perhaps every word ever writ is fiction. Or, truth is oddly difficult to mime.

Things were different back then, I was less broken, and so was the internet. It was just a baby; now it’s an angry teen. Tonight I’ll go back to all my likes, like a sick dating site only I’m taking part in. It’s easy to obsess about strangers. You just pour nothingness outward, as if, through some accident in the universe, that very act could somehow fill you. I will look for warm clues scattered behind her — the blurry spines of books I sort of recognize; the posters of vaguely alternative bands everyone knows too well; the clothes hanging in her closet I can almost touch and smell; the plant she nurtures in place of me, its soil darkening with care — as if the mystery of why she liked this, why she liked me, could ever be solved.

Jan
6

Cycling can be humbling…

Over the Holidays, I was lucky enough to spend some time with both my immediate and extended family on my Dad’s side. It was a blast. My family is so spread out across the country it’s a never ending struggle to see one another.

My grandparents live in Arkansas, and the weather this year was mild nationwide, but the high temps there were in the 50′s. I took a couple bikes down with us so that Jon (younger brother) and I could do a little riding. The weather in KC had been pretty rainy and dismal, and I’d been busy finishing my place in River Market, and so I was out of shape, and a little rusty to say the least.

See Proof:

I have no idea how this really happened.

Sometimes a little embarrassment is a good thing.

I was proud of Jon though. He tore it up, and had no significant falls. He was taking big drops left and right on my single speed, rigid suspension 29er I built earlier in the year.

Apr
4

Pick two. But I want all 3…

By Josh  //  life, Uncategorized  //  No Comments

How come no one ever told me life was this way:

Note (5/24/11): I think I found all three of these characteristics in one person. Her name is Diane.

Quotes I Like…

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. ~Plato

We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak. ~Epictetus

Anyone who trades liberty for security, deserves neither liberty nor security. ~Benjamin Franklin

Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as they do it from religeous conviction. ~Blaise Pascal

When a person is down in the world, an ounce of help is better than a pound of preaching. ~Edward G. Bulwer-Lytton